Alzheimer’s: Why Are We Doing So Little?

I love TED Talks!  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, go to TED.com and search for anything — but please come back.  TEDMED extends into the world of medicine and wellness, which is where the video below is from.

Gregory Petsko, Chair of the Department of Biochemistry at Brandeis University, gives a presentation on Alzheimer’s disease that is easy to understand and with a sense of urgency.  In the video, Dr. Petsko tries to answer the question, “Why, in the face of this oncoming tsunami of Alzheimer’s, are we doing so little?”  He then offers four possible answers.

1.  Stigma.  The way Alzheimer’s impacts the brain and ultimately the actions of the afflicted can come across as a mental illness.  They act strange and we don’t know what to do with them — so we pretend they’re not there and they become invisible.

2.  We all get senile as we get older right?  Wrong.  But so many people accept the senility of an Alzheimer’s sufferer as normal.  It’s not.

3.  Alzheimer’s patients are not able to advocate for themselves.  They can barely communicate effectively  — how would they ever launch a plan to improve care and funding for this disease?

4.  The caregivers who are caring for their loved ones are just too tired and overwhelmed to take on anything else.

So who will speak up for Alzheimer’s disease to garner more attention and funding? 

Perhaps it’s people like you and I who are watching our loved ones succumb to this disease, but who still have a VOICE.  Rather than wait and hope the disease doesn’t find us, what if we were proactive in our efforts to fight this disease?  And what if our fight made such an impact that funding and research was increased and the number of Alzheimer’s sufferers was decreased?

Learn more about what you can do to help elevate Alzheimer’s from a disease to a cause by becoming an advocate for the Alzheimer’s Association.  I have joined the cause.  I don’t know what I’m going to do yet, but I’ve joined.

This is a 16 minute video that’s packed with information.  Check it out to see why I now imagine little garbage trucks going to the recycle bin inside my brain rather than the garbage dump.

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